Holy Exploding Watermelons! One More Reason to Avoid Chinese Produce

We’ve been pretty harsh critics of products from China on This Green Earth and this is further proof that our criticism is justified.   Today we learned that watermelons are exploding in China because they were given high levels of a growth hormone, among other additives.  Apparently, the Land Mine Melons were given the growth accelerator forchlorfenuron.  This particular growth hormone is deemed “safe” (okay, sure, whatever), but the exploding melons have raised other concerns about Chinese farming practices.

According to this Yahoo article, “[i]n March last year, Chinese authorities found that “yard-long” beans from the southern city of Sanya had been treated with the banned pesticide isocarbophos. The tainted beans turned up in several provinces, and the central city of Wuhan announced it destroyed 3.5 tons of the vegetable”.

There is also widespread overuse of food additives like dyes and sweeteners that retailers hope will make food more attractive and boost sales.  Last year, there was an extensive study of arsenic in apple juice that found arsenic in almost all commercial apple juice but found particularly high levels in apple juice coming from China.
The bottom line is that the Chinese are just starting to police their food system, so it’s unclear what is being added to Chinese food.  Read your labels, don’t buy Chinese and buy local when you can.

In the meantime, it’s sad that these inexperienced farmers have lost their crops due to this growth hormone.  The crops have been ruined at alarming rates and they’re now using the watermelons as fish and pig feed.  I sure hope we don’t see exploding fish and pigs out of China next week!

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About Laurie Noble

As head of her own corporate communications and public relations company, Laurie Carter Noble has had extensive experience in creating successful marketing strategies. She has drawn on this expertise in her real estate career and has found it invaluable in helping clients create successful marketing strategies for selling their homes. Giving clients marketing plans targeted to their specific needs and highlighting the unique qualities of their homes is one of the services Laurie provides to those who list their homes with her. Having moved a family several times herself, with the help of her husband Richard, she is aware of the special needs of the buyer relocating to a new home. Through careful research and a thorough knowledge of the Boston market, Laurie successfully matches prospective buyers to a home suited to their needs. Her guidance is available through every aspect of the purchasing transaction, whether it is helping to secure financing, having the home inspected or making temporary housing arrangements, should that be required. With her husband, Richard, Laurie has developed and managed a series of properties. She has extensive experiences dealing with investment properties and using them effectively to create income. A cum laude graduate of Syracuse University, Laurie received her B.A. in English Literature and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. She also holds an M.S. in Secondary Education and an M.A. in English from Villanova University. A fluent speaker of German, Laurie studied German literature at the Yale University Graduate School and at the University of Heidelberg, Germany. She also is fluent in French, which she studied at the University of Strasbourg, France. For many years she was a member of the English Department at Villanova University. Laurie is committed to serving the community in which she lives. She has done pro bono work for agencies that work for social justice in Boston. Issues of women's and children's welfare are of particular concern to her and she has written on those issues for newspapers and magazines in the Boston area. She is a tour guide for the Mayo House, a historic house owned by the Chatham Conservation Society and is also a pro bono marketing consultant for the Harwich Junior Theater, promoting artistic opportunities for children all over Cape Cod. Recently Laurie completed a major marketing portfolio, pro bono, for COGdesign, a non-profit Boston based organization dedicated to helping urban communities create beautiful inner city green spaces. While a member of the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce, she was active in the Women’s Network and served on the Education Committee. She has lived in Boston’s Back Bay for almost 20 years and is a member of the Neighborhood Association of the Back Bay. Laurie and Richard have two daughters.
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